School Improvement Plan

  • What is the School Advisory Council (SAC)?

    The School Advisory Council is the sole body responsible for final decision-making at the school relating to implementation of ss.1001.42(18) and1008.345.U The SAC is composed of parents, teachers, community members, school administrators, non-instructional support staff, and other stakeholders who meet regularly to establish priorities, set annual objectives, and monitor action steps for school improvement.

    Want to learn more about SAC, see the video clip below! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DHXN1QX-HU

    For the 2019-2020 school year, The SAC Co-Chairs are:

    Mrs. Dawn Lopez (dawn.lopez@browardschools.com)

    Ms. Jessica Abraham (jessica.abraham@browardschools.com)

    What is the School Improvement Plan (SIP)?
    The School Improvement Plan (SIP) is a set of goals, objectives and action steps, that drives our educational activities relating to school improvement and education accountability.  Parents, teachers, and administrators all have a role in developing these goals.  Each plan shall address issues relative to budget, training, instructional materials, technology, staffing, student support services, specific school safety and discipline strategies, and other matters of resource allocation, as determined by district school board policy, and shall be based on an analysis of student achievement and other school performance data. You can find links to all agendas and minutes form all SAC and SAF meetings within our School Improvement Plan.

    Click here to view our School Improvement Plan: http://www.broward.k12.fl.us/ospa/sw_school_info.asp?school_number=3581&cadre_number=6  

    Click here for Roberts Rules of Order: Roberts Rules of Order

    Florida Sunshine Law:

    To assist the public and governmental agencies in understanding the requirements and exemptions to Florida's open government laws, the Attorney General's Office compiles a comprehensive guide known as the Government-in-the-Sunshine manual. The manual is published each year at no taxpayer expense by the First Amendment Foundation in Tallahassee.

    Florida began its tradition of openness back in 1909 with the passage of Chapter 119 of the Florida Statutes or the “Public Records Law.” This law provides that any records made or received by any public agency in the course of its official business are available for inspection, unless specifically exempted by the Florida Legislature. Over the years, the definition of what constitutes “public records” has come to include not just traditional written documents such as papers, maps and books, but also tapes, photographs, film, sound recordings and records stored in computers.

    Florida's Government-in-the-Sunshine Law was enacted in 1967. Today, the Sunshine Law regarding open government can be found in Chapter 286 of the Florida Statutes. These statutes establish a basic right of access to most meetings of boards, commissions and other governing bodies of state and local governmental agencies or authorities.

    Throughout the history of Florida's open government, its courts have consistently supported the public's right of access to governmental meetings and records. As such, they also have been defining and redefining what a public record is and who is covered under the open meetings law. One area of public concern was whether or not the Legislature was covered under the open meetings requirements. To address that concern, a Constitutional amendment was passed overwhelmingly by the voters in 1990 providing for open meetings in the legislative branch of government.

    The Attorney General's Office has consistently sought to safeguard Florida's pioneering Government-in-the-Sunshine laws. Our attorneys have worked, both in the courtroom and out, to halt public records violations. In 1991, a decision by the Florida Supreme Court raised questions which made it clear that the best way to ensure the public's right of access to all three branches of government was to secure that right through the Florida Constitution. The Attorney General's Office then drafted a definitive constitutional amendment, which guaranteed continued openness in the state's government and reaffirmed the application of open government to the legislative branch and expanded it to the judiciary. This amendment passed in 1992.

     

    What is the School Advisory Council (SAF)?

    School Board policy requires that each school have a School Advisory Forum (SAF) composed of parents, teachers, community members, school administrators, non-instructional support staff, and other stakeholders. The SAF provides an opportunity for stakeholders to discuss and recommend actions on a variety of school issues. The School Advisory Forum (SAF) shall foster and promote communication between its stakeholders, the school, and the Area Advisory Council. The SAF shall bring forth recommendations, concerns and interests to and from their Area Advisory Council.