Chess Club

  • The Glades Middle Chess Club meets every Monday from 4:00-5:15 in Room 255. The club is open all year to anyone who wishes to join and play. Open Training is conducted on Wednesdays, from 4:00-5:15. Students must have permission slips on file to remain in the club, and must be picked up promptly by 5:30. Permission slips are available in Room 255.

    “As a game of strategy, chess enables players to better recognize complexity and enhance their analytical capabilities when they analyze each move in the game. Additionally, members develop their patience and tenacity when playing the game, as they are constantly on the lookout for potential threats. Chess players need strong willpower to overcome temporary setbacks and to persevere and play to their best ability during the games. As there are more twists and turns than a roller-coaster ride in each chess game, there is never a dull moment while playing! In the process, members of Chess Club are all trained to possess strong mental strength and fine analytical skills.”(Credit: New York Chess Organization)

    Glades Middle Chess Team frequently participates in external competitions throughout the year, including the National Scholastic Grade Championship. Participation in competitions is entirely voluntary, and parents are responsible for all entry fees, transportation, meals, and lodging (lodging is only necessary if the competition is out of town). Information on competitions is on the club’s Edmodo site.

    Please see or contact Miss Lieber in Room 255, or by email at sondra.lieber@browardschools.com for more information.

    Mrs. Lieber

    FM (Fide Master - international chess master) Sunil Weeramantry (on the right) and Robert McClellan (National Scholastic Chess Foundation) wrote a chess textbook for middle schoolers titled "Great Moves: Chess Through History."

    Our very own Chess Club Sponsor, Ms. Lieber was asked to review the textbook and provide input. Ms. Lieber's analysis of the textbook revealed that the questions were not challenging enough for middle school students and were not equivalent to the "LAFS" standards.

    Ms. Lieber rewrote the questions to provide more rigor and alignment to the LAFS standards. Ms. Lieber will be acknowledged in the textbook for her contribution. We are very proud of Ms. Lieber's accomplishments!