• Medical Sciences

    Doris Medical Magnet Students explore their interests, identify potential career paths, and make informed post-secondary decisions. We provide every student the opportunity to gain experience and confidence needed to move in the direction of their career goals. Our students participate in cooperative learning with a number of our partners in education, integrating course work, and professional experience. Magnet students divide their time between the classroom and the workplace. We empower young professionals to engage in productive and fulfilling coursework and research that will contribute to the community and the future of global healthcare. We transform students into community leaders.

    Curriculum

    Our Medical Science Majors are modeled on an integrated curriculum that includes foundational courses in the natural sciences, social sciences, and liberal arts, as well as application-based coursework on health and healthcare.

    Students in our magnet program learn the value of working as members of a health care team in the class setting as well as through Cooperative Learning (Co-op) experiences. Our Co-op experiences allow students to learn and recognize the importance of professional behaviors both in the classroom and in the workplace.

    • Co-op

    • Capstone

     SHS magnet students have the opportunity to complete the medical sciences programs, with or without a cooperative learning experience. Please review course sequences below.
  • Biomedical Sciences

    The Biomedical Science pathway is also designed for students who are seeking a strong foundation for post-secondary studies in Biological Sciences. Accpetance into the Schoolchoice Magnet Program is required for this Pathway.

    * Students in the Biomedical Sciences Pathway are required to complete Physics at Stranahan High School or an equally rigorus science course through BC Dual Enrollment for magnet distinction.

    This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in the Health Science career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competency-based applied learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical skills, and occupation-specific skills, and knowledge of all aspects of the Health Science career cluster.

    The purpose of this program is to provide students with a foundation of knowledge and technically oriented experiences in the study and applications of biomedical sciences and the possibilities in the biomedical field. 

    Principles of Biomedical Sciences. The Principles of Biomedical Science (PBS) course provides an introduction to biomedical science through exciting hands-on projects and problems. Students investigate concepts of biology and medicine as they explore health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases.

    The activities and projects in PBS introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes and allow students to design experiments to solve problems. Key biological concepts, including maintenance of homeostasis in the body, metabolism, inheritance of traits, and defense against disease are embedded in the curriculum.

    Students practice problem solving with structured activities and progress to open-ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and other professional skills.

    PREREQUISITE: Magnet Coordinator Approval  

    Human Body Systems. In the Human Body Systems (HBS) course, students examine the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work through interesting real world cases, and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries.

    Students practice problem solving with structured activities and progress to open-ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and other professional skills.

    PREREQUISITE: Principles of Biomedical Science

    Medical Interventions. The Medical Interventions (MI) course allows students to investigate the variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease as they follow the lives of a fictitious family. This course will explore how to prevent and fight infection, how to screen and evaluate the code in our DNA, how to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer, and how to prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail.

    Through authentic and engaging scenarios students will be exposed to the wide range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics.

    Lifestyle choices and preventive measures are emphasized throughout the course as well as the important role that scientific thinking and engineering design play in the development of interventions of the future.

    Students practice problem solving with projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and other professional skills.

    PREREQUISITE: Human Body Systems

    Biomedical Innovation. In the Biomedical Innovation (BI) students design innovative solutions for the health challenges of the 21st century as they work through progressively challenging open-ended problems, addressing topics such as clinical medicine, physiology, biomedical engineering, and public health.

    Students will be asked to apply what they have learned in the previous three courses to solve unique problems in science, medicine, and healthcare. Students will work systematically through required problems before completing optional directed problems or independent work. Students will use what they learn in this course as they develop and implement their independent project at the end of the year. 

    Throughout the course, students are expected to present their work to an adult audience that may include representatives from the local business and healthcare community.

    PREREQUISITE: Medical Interventions

  • Allied Health

    This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in the Health Science career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competency-based applied learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical skills, and occupation-specific skills, and knowledge of all aspects of Health Science career cluster.

    Medical Skills. The course will cover the history of health care, the health care delivery system, legal and ethical responsibilities, practice safety and security procedures as well as infection control procedures including blood borne diseases, including AIDS. Students will investigate factors that affect whole body wellness and demonstrate basic health skills, including first aid, CPR and BLS. Medical terminology is the backbone of the health science cluster and will be learned throughout course.

    A large part of this health occupation course will include exploring the many different occupations in the health care field with extensive research on job outlook, educational programs, length of training, licensure/certification, areas of specialization and salary. Students will be expected to demonstrate employability skills.

    Students must be a member of Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) and will be encouraged to participate in HOSA events.

    PREREQUISITE: None  

    Health Science Anatomy & Physiology. This course is part of the secondary Health Core consisting of an overview of the human body, both structurally and functionally with emphasis on the pathophysiology and transmission of disease.  Medical terminology is an integral part of the course.

    Laboratory investigations that include scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, emerging technologies, tools and equipment, as well as, experimental quality, and safety procedures will be an integral part of this course. Students will interact with materials and primary sources of data or with secondary sources of data to observe and understand the natural world. Students will develop an understanding of measurement error, and develop the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the data and resulting conclusions 

    Students must be a member of Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) and will be encouraged to participate in HOSA events.

    PREREQUISITE: Medical Skills

    Health Science Foundations. This course is part of the secondary Health Core designed to provide the student with an in depth knowledge of the health care system and associated occupations.  Students will also learn first aid skills and demonstrate the measurement of vital signs.

    Emphasis is placed on communication and interpersonal skills, use of technology, ethics and the development of critical thinking. Students practice problem solving with structured activities and progress to open-ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and other professional skills. Students may shadow professionals throughout the course. 

    Students must be a member of Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) and will be encouraged to participate in HOSA events.

    PREREQUISITE: Health Science Anatomy & Physiology

    Allied Health Assisting 3. In this course students will perform skills representative of one to three areas of allied health care in the laboratory and clinical settings.  Major areas of allied health are defined as physical therapy, radiation, EKG, laboratory and respiratory medicine, and occupational therapy.  Other areas of health, medicine, dentistry, or veterinary may be included with instructor provided competencies.

    Throughout the course, students are expected to present their work to an adult audience that may include representatives from the local business and healthcare community.

    Students will shadow healthcare professionals throughout the course. 

    Students must be a member of Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) and will be encouraged to participate in HOSA events.

    PREREQUISITE: Successful Completion of the Application and Interview Process

  • Emergency Medical Responder

    This instructional program prepares individuals to provide initial care to sick or injured persons or as ambulance drivers and attendants.  The Emergency Medical Responder is the first to arrive at the scene of an injury but does not have the primary responsibility for treating and transporting the injured person(s).  Emergency Medical Responders may include law enforcement, lifeguard, fire services or basic life support non-licensed personnel who act as part of an organized emergency medical services team. 

    This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in the Health Science career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competency-based applied learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical skills, and occupation-specific skills, and knowledge of all aspects of Health Science career cluster.

    Medical Skills. The course will cover the history of health care, the health care delivery system, legal and ethical responsibilities, practice safety and security procedures as well as infection control procedures including blood borne diseases, including AIDS. Students will investigate factors that affect whole body wellness and demonstrate basic health skills, including first aid, CPR and BLS. Medical terminology is the backbone of the health science cluster and will be learned throughout course.

    A large part of this health occupation course will include exploring the many different occupations in the health care field with extensive research on job outlook, educational programs, length of training, licensure/certification, areas of specialization and salary. Students will be expected to demonstrate employability skills.

    Students must be a member of Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) and will be encouraged to participate in HOSA events.

    PREREQUISITE: None  

    Health Science Anatomy & Physiology. This course is part of the secondary Health Core consisting of an overview of the human body, both structurally and functionally with emphasis on the pathophysiology and transmission of disease.  Medical terminology is an integral part of the course.

    Laboratory investigations that include scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, emerging technologies, tools and equipment, as well as, experimental quality, and safety procedures will be an integral part of this course. Students will interact with materials and primary sources of data or with secondary sources of data to observe and understand the natural world. Students will develop an understanding of measurement error, and develop the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the data and resulting conclusions 

    Students must be a member of Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) and will be encouraged to participate in HOSA events.

    PREREQUISITE: Medical Skills

    Health Science Foundations. This course is part of the secondary Health Core designed to provide the student with an in depth knowledge of the health care system and associated occupations.  Students will also learn first aid skills and demonstrate the measurement of vital signs.

    Emphasis is placed on communication and interpersonal skills, use of technology, ethics and the development of critical thinking. Students practice problem solving with structured activities and progress to open-ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and other professional skills. Students may shadow professionals throughout the course. 

    Students must be a member of Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) and will be encouraged to participate in HOSA events.

    PREREQUISITE: Health Science Anatomy & Physiology

    Emergency Medical Responder 3. This course prepares students to be employed as Emergency Medical Responders. Content includes, but not limited to, identifying and practicing within the appropriate scope of practice for an Emergency Medical Responder, demonstrating correct medical procedures for various emergency situations, proficiency in the appropriate instruments used, as well as a foundation in the musculoskeletal system of the body.

    Throughout the course, students are expected to present their work to an adult audience that may include representatives from the local business and healthcare community.

    Students must be a member of Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) and will be encouraged to participate in HOSA events.

    PREREQUISITE: Health Science Foundations

  • Aquatic Veterinary Sciences

  • Electives correlate to identified pathways. Pursuing electives outside of your pathway depends on availability and instructor discretion (please see instructor for prerequisite details). Students must be a member of their magnet program's career and technical student organization (CTSO) and will be encouraged to participate in CTSO events.

    Magnet Distinction Requirements

    Students earning magnet distinction will have completed 3 pathway courses, earned one or more industry certifications, acquired at least 100 service hours (60 of which related to their program of study known as magnet service hours), completed their summer internship* (summer of junior year), completed and successfully presented senior year project, and maintained academic performance and course requirements consistent with magnet standards for their program of study.

    Students must meet all required program components for magnet distinction. If you have additional questions please contact your magnet coordinator.
     

     

    Curriculum is subject to change. For descriptions of the courses included in the School of Medical Sciences, please click here.

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